Special issue: Is the Postcolonial Postsecular?

From Critical Research on Religion

The postcolonial signifies a historical period, an oppositional stance, or both. It is the time after colonialism, or it is the struggle against colonialism. Colonialism does not simply end; it ends through struggle. That struggle shapes the time after colonialism: the institutions, values, and political landscape that remain once formal colonial control has ceased.  This article from the special issue surveys the role of religion in postcolonial theory and the role of colonialism in studies of secularism. It concludes that close study of specific examples of the intersection of the modern, the colonial, and the secular is the most effective method of answering the article’s animating question.

 

Abstract

This article surveys the role of religion in postcolonial theory and the role of colonialism in studies of secularism. Despite a secularist image, postcolonial theory from its start has critically engaged with questions of religion. Similarly, despite secularism’s Eurocentric image, some studies of secularism have reflected on the way the category of religion is constructed in colonial encounters. Bringing these conversations together, we examine the secular–modern–colonial conceptual knot. The article concludes that close study of specific examples of the intersection of the modern, the colonial, and the secular is the most effective method of answering the article’s animating question.

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Article details
Special issue: Is the Postcolonial Postsecular?:
Vincent William Lloyd and Ludger Viefhues-Bailey
Introduction: Is the Postcolonial Postsecular?
Critical Research on Religion April 2015 3: 13-24, first published on April 24, 2015 doi:10.1177/2050303215577494

 

 

 

     
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