Quidditch: Impacting and Benefiting Participants in a Non-Fictional Manner

From Journal of Sport & Social Issues

Throughout the years, sport and physical activities have constantly been adapted, reinvented, or even created from scratch. Often, the root cause of these innovations is the burnout or dropout among participants that occurs with more mainstream activities when sport loses its enjoyment for them This study examines the sport of quidditch, based on the Harry Potter franchise, an alternative sport growing in popularity. The purpose of this research was to examine the impact and benefits participants of this sport received and determine similarities and differences to mainstream sport activities. Findings suggest involvement with quidditch provided leadership skills, social gains, self-confidence, and pride, along with a positive sporting experience, all of which have been recognized in more mainstream sports. The conclusions of this research note the potential sport can have, beyond the mainstream and formal outlets that are more commonly offered.

Abstract

This study examines the sport of quidditch, based on the Harry Potter franchise, an alternative sport growing in popularity. The purpose of this research was to examine the impact and benefits participants of this sport received and determine similarities and differences to mainstream sport activities. Findings suggest involvement with quidditch provided leadership skills, social gains, self-confidence, and pride, along with a positive sporting experience, all of which have been recognized in more mainstream sports. Considering the need for inventive and fiscally viable sports programs due to shrinking budgets and increased burnout, this study advocates the potential value of alternative sport initiatives and the benefit of their implementation.

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Article details
Adam Cohen and Jon Welty Peachey
Quidditch: Impacting and Benefiting Participants in a Non-Fictional Manner
Journal of Sport & Social Issues 0193723514561549, first published on December 7, 2014 doi:10.1177/0193723514561549

 

 

 

 

 

 

     
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