Free access to journal articles to celebrate World Social Work Day

To mark World Social Work Day SAGE has opened access to some articles from key titles.

Articles

Mathbor, G. (2007). Enhancement of community preparedness for natural disasters: The role of social work in building social capital for sustainable disaster relief and management International Social Work, 50 (3), 357-369 DOI: 10.1177/0020872807076049
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Moe, A. (2009). Battered Women, Children, and the End of Abusive Relationships Affilia, 24 (3), 244-256 DOI: 10.1177/0886109909337374
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Vandenbroucke, F., & Vleminckx, K. (2011). Disappointing poverty trends: is the social investment state to blame? Journal of European Social Policy, 21 (5), 450-471 DOI: 10.1177/0958928711418857
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Abstracts


Enhancement of community preparedness for natural disasters
The role of social work in building social capital for sustainable disaster relief and management This article examines the scope and prospect for effective utilization of social capital in mitigating the consequences of natural disasters that hit coastal regions. The article concludes by identifying the role of social work education and practice in building social capital for sustainable disaster relief and management.

Battered women, children, and the end of abusive relationships
Much work has focused on the interpersonal dynamics of violent relationships, but less is known about the specific turning points that prompt women at least to try to end them. Using a feminist standpoint method and phenomenological-based analysis of in-depth interviews with mothers in a domestic violence shelter, this article focuses on the role of children in women’s decisions to leave abusive partners. It discusses arriving at the decision, the logistics involved in leaving and planning for the future, and it presents policy and advocacy-based recommendations that are aimed at addressing the social welfare of women and children.

Disappointing poverty trends: is the social investment state to blame?
Should we explain the disappointing outcomes of the Open Method of Co-ordination on Inclusion by methodological weaknesses or by substantive contradictions in the ‘social investment’ paradigm? To clarify the underlying concepts, we first revisit the original ‘Lisbon inspiration’ and then relate it to the idea of the ‘new welfare state’, as proposed in the literature on new risks in post-industrial societies. We then discuss two explanations for disappointing poverty trends, suggested by critical accounts of the ‘social investment state’: ‘resource competition’ and a ‘re-commodification’. We do not find these explanations convincing per se and conclude that the jury is still out on the ‘social investment state’. However, policy-makers cannot ignore the failure of employment policies to reduce the proportion of children and working-age adults living in jobless households in the EU, and they should not deny the reality of a ‘trilemma of activation’. Finally, we identify policy conditions that may facilitate the complementarity of social investment and social inclusion.


     
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