On SAGE Insight: Blog Posts from SAGE Open Access in 2018

In 2018, open access journals at SAGE began experimenting with a new style of blog post, to aid authors in reaching new audiences with their research. These new blog posts allow the author to summarise one or more of the major arguments of their research articles, directed at the interested layperson. Over the past year, our authors have tackled many questions, such as whether race plays a role in pulmonary hypertension, how substance abuse treatment for young people can overcome gender bias, and why Republican members of Congress refused to support Donald Trump in the 2016 election.

All of these posts from 2018 are gathered below. Simply click on the title and read each post in full. We look forward to supporting our authors in disseminating their research in 2019.

From Chronic Respiratory Disease:

Does antibiotic treatment duration affect the outcomes of exacerbations of asthma and pulmonary disease?

***

From Journal of Concussion:

Concussion beliefs in varsity athletes: Identifying the good, the bad and the ugly

***

From Brain and Neuroscience Advances:

Circadian mood variations in Twitter content

***

From Research & Politics:

Democracy and Police Violence

***

From Health Psychology Open:

Community-wide physical activity intervention significantly increases mental wellbeing

***

From Digital Health:

Keep calm, there is an app to help you control your smartphone use

***

From Global Advances in Health and Medicine:

Tele-yoga for Chronic Pain – Current Status and Future Directions

***

From Chronic Stress:

PTSD and the War of Words

***

From Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare:

Singaporean mothers of children with ADHD

***

From Research & Politics:

Identity best explains the #NeverTrump movement

***

From Pulmonary Circulation:

Does race play a role in pulmonary hypertension?

***

From Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs:

How do we make substance abuse treatment for young people more equal?

***

From Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs:

Powerful substances in tiny amounts: An interview study of psychedelic microdosing

***

From Journal of Ocean and Climate:

Microplastics and the marine environment

By –

Kathleen Sargeant is a Marketing Manager in the Open Access Marketing team at SAGE Publishing in London.

     
This entry was posted in Medicine, OA, Politics, Psychology, SAGE Connection, SAGE Insight, Social Work & Social Policy. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply