On SAGE Insight; Are White Women Showing Up for Racial Justice?

Article title: Are White Women Showing Up for Racial Justice? Intergroup  Contact, Closeness to People Targeted by Prejudice, and Collective Action

From Psychology of Women Quarterly

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 86367_sppwq_41_3_72ppiRGB_150pixw.jpg

A fervent resurgence in the struggle for racial justice has taken place in the United States over the last several years. From initial use of the hashtag #blacklivesmatter to the development of the Movement for Black Lives (see Movement for Black Lives, 2016), the urgency of recognizing the value and dignity of the lives of people of color has continued to grow in light of increased numbers of hate crimes targeting racial, ethnic, and religious minority groups. At the same time, numerous scholars using varied methodologies have documented how fervently many White women are committed to racial justice, highlighting the importance of anti-racism work in White women’s lives In interviews, many White women have described how meaningful relationships with people of color fueled their involvement in activism for racial justice). Given the proliferation of racially charged incidents in the United States in recent years, coupled with a rise in hate crimes against ethno-religious communities such as Muslims and Jews authors of this paper studied White women’s closeness with members of groups that have been targeted by prejudice (e.g., insults or slurs on the basis of their race or ethnicity.

With a broad online sample of White American women (Study 1), and White women who attended the 2017 Women’s March (Study 2), The results showed that both positive contact and closeness to people targeted by prejudice predicted White women’s willingness to participate in protests for racial justice (Studies 1 and 2). While forging close relationships across group lines has the potential to benefit members of both advantaged and disadvantaged groups we should also be mindful of the inappropriate burdens associated with placing members of disadvantaged groups in the position of having to “educate” those in privileged positions about injustice.

Abstract

Although scholars have suggested that relationships with people of color can enhance White people’s commitment to racial justice, many women of color have questioned whether White people, and White women in particular, actually “show up” to protest for racial justice. Focusing on the contact experiences and closeness White women have with people from racial and ethnic groups different from their own, we tested how these relationships may predict their reported motivations to engage in protests for racial justice. With a broad online sample of White American women (Study 1), and White women who attended the 2017 Women’s March (Study 2), our results showed that both positive contact and closeness to people targeted by prejudice predicted White women’s willingness to participate in protests for racial justice (Studies 1 and 2). Only closeness to people targeted by prejudice significantly predicted actual participation in collective action for racial justice (Studies 1 and 2) and also predicted motivation for racial justice among those who attended the 2017 Women’s March (Study 2). Findings suggest that White women’s inclinations to protest for racial justice may be linked to the close relationships they have with people targeted by prejudice, while more general forms of positive contact may not be related to such action. 

Read the article in full here

Article details

Are White Women Showing Up for Racial Justice? Intergroup  Contact, Closeness to People Targeted by Prejudice, and Collective Action
Linda R. Tropp, Özden Melis Uluğ
First Published April 8, 2019 Research Article
DOI:  10.1177/0361684319840269
Psychology of Women Quarterly


     
This entry was posted in Psychology, SAGE Insight and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply