On SAGE Insight: The relation between social identity and test anxiety in university students

From Health Psychology Open

Students have relationships with several social communities, such as friends or university study groups. This membership can be supportive through personal security, intellectual stimulation, and collaborative learning. Social identification has been shown to be a protective resource for mental health. In this study, the relationships between social identification and emotional, as well as cognitive symptoms of test anxiety are investigated.

Students responded to the call for volunteers from the University of Mainz, the University of Frankfurt, and other regional universities. After screening, the final study sample was 108. They completed questionnaires regarding a range of psychopathologic stress symptoms, and their social identification with fellow students and with their study program.

Results reveal negative relations between social identification and almost all investigated emotional and cognitive symptoms of test anxiety. Based on this study, interventions could be developed that strengthen the social identity of university students.

Abstract

Social identification has been shown to be a protective resource for mental health. In this study, the relationships between social identification and emotional, as well as cognitive symptoms of test anxiety are investigated. Participants were university students diagnosed with test anxiety (N = 108). They completed questionnaires regarding a range of psychopathologic stress symptoms, and their social identification with fellow students and with their study program. Results reveal negative relations between social identification and almost all investigated emotional and cognitive symptoms of test anxiety. Based on this study, interventions could be developed that strengthen the social identity of university students.

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Article details
The relation between social identity and test anxiety in university students
Clara Zwettler, Neele Reiss, Sonja Rohrmann, Irene Warnecke, Ursula Luka-Krausgrill, Rolf van Dick,
DOI: 10.1177/2055102918785415
Article first published online: July 5, 2018; Issue published: July 1, 2018
From Health Psychology Open

 

 

     
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