On SAGE Insight: Assessment of #TheDress With Traditional Color Vision Tests

Article title: Assessment of #TheDress With Traditional Color Vision Tests: Perception Differences Are Associated With Blueness

From i-Perception

#TheDress phenomenon that began after Caitlin McNeil posted a picture of the dress on February 26, 2015 has provoked much discussion within the color vision science community and in the general public because it is unclear why people perceive the dress image, for the most part, in one of two very different ways.

Based on known color vision theories, there is no complete explanation for the perceptual dichotomy of #TheDress in which most people see either white-and-gold (WG) or blue-and-black (BK). Authors in this paper determined whether some standard color vision tests (i.e., color naming, color matching, anomaloscope settings, unique white settings, and color preferences), as well as chronotypes, could provide information on the color perceptions of #TheDress.

This study showed a significant difference among the groups involved blue percepts, suggesting that variations in attributing ‘‘blueness’’ to the #TheDress image, possibly due to interpretations of the illuminant interactions with the dress material, may be the significant variable determining the perception of #TheDress.

Abstract

Based on known color vision theories, there is no complete explanation for the perceptual dichotomy of #TheDress in which most people see either white-and-gold (WG) or blue-and-black (BK). We determined whether some standard color vision tests (i.e., color naming, color matching, anomaloscope settings, unique white settings, and color preferences), as well as chronotypes, could provide information on the color perceptions of #TheDress. Fifty-two young observers were tested. Fifteen of the observers (29%) reported the colors as BK, 21 (40%) as WG, and 16 (31%) reported a different combination of colors. Observers who perceived WG required significantly more blue in their unique white settings than those who perceived BK. The BK, blue-and-gold, and WG observer groups had significantly different color preferences for the light cyan chip. Moreland equation anomaloscope matching showed a significant difference between WG and BK observers. In addition, #TheDress color perception categories, color preference outcomes, and unique white settings had a common association. For both the bright and dark regions of #TheDress, the color matching chromaticities formed a continuum, approximately following the daylight chromaticity locus. Color matching to the bright region of #TheDress showed two nearly distinct clusters (WG vs. BK) along the daylight chromaticity locus and there was a clear cutoff for reporting WG versus BK. All results showing a significant difference involved blue percepts, possibly due to interpretations of the illuminant interactions with the dress material. This suggests that variations in attributing blueness to the #TheDress image may be significant variables determining color perception of #TheDress.

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Article details
Assessment of #TheDress With Traditional Color Vision Tests: Perception Differences Are Associated With Blueness
Claudia Feitosa-SantanaMargaret LutzePablo A. BarrionuevoDingcai Cao
First Published March 27, 2018
DOI: 10.1177/2041669518764192
From i-Perception

 

     
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