On SAGE Insight: Association between sleep time and depression

Article title: Association between sleep time and depression: a cross-sectional study from countries in rural Northeastern China

From The Journal of International Medical Research (JIMR)

Sleep is an important part of life. It occupies approximately one-third of our life span and has been proven to be closely related to our health. The topic of sleep deprivation and its consequences for our health has emerged regularly in recent news. A large amount of evidence indicates that sleep has a moderating effect on the nervous, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems. Additionally, a lack of sleep and hyperhypnosis can both increase the risk of developing diseases. Moreover, the core symptom of depression is a sleep disorder. Of patients with depression, 90% have insomnia, while a small subset experience drowsiness. The incidence rates of depression and anxiety are significantly higher in people with a sleep disorder than those in patients without one. Furthermore, there is a bidirectional connection between insomnia and depression. Insomnia aggravates depression, and depression negatively affects the quality of sleep, creating a vicious circle. This paper investigates the current situation of sleep status and examine its association with depression among counties in rural areas of Liaoning Province, China. This investigation found that excess or lack of sleep increased the risk of depression. Specifically, the risk of depression is significantly higher in people with less than 6 h or more than 9 h of sleep compared with those with 6–8 h of sleep. Additionally, the risk of developing depression is four times higher in residents with less than 6 h of sleep than in those with 7–8 h of sleep. In subjects with the same amount of sleep, having an age of 65 years or above was a risk factor for depression.

Abstract

Objective
To investigate the current situation of sleep status and examine its association with depression among counties in rural areas of Liaoning Province, China.

Methods
This cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to August 2013 in Northeast China. A total of 11,276 subjects aged ≥35 years were surveyed and completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9; each participant answered questions about their sleep duration.

Results
For individuals with a sleep time of ≤6, 6–7, 7–8, 8–9, and ≥9 h, the respective risk of depression was 10.8%, 3.7%, 2.6%, 2.7%, and 5.7% in subjects younger than 65 years old and 15.2%, 5.4%, 3.2%, 6.5%, and 8.6% in those 65 years old or older.

Conclusion
In the rural population of Liaoning Province, sleep duration and depression are closely related. Both short sleep and long sleep are risk factors for depression. Optimizing sleep status may contribute to good physical and mental health

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Article details
Association between sleep time and depression: a cross-sectional study from countries in rural Northeastern China
Jiang Mohan, Guo Xiaofan, Sun Yingxian
First Published April 20, 2017
DOI: 10.1177/0300060517701034
Journal of International Medical Research

 

     
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