On SAGE Insight: Decontamination of breast pump milk collection kits and related items at home and in hospital


Article title: Decontamination of breast pump milk collection kits and related items at home and in hospital: guidance from a Joint Working Group of the Healthcare Infection Society & Infection Prevention Society

From Journal of Infection Prevention

A variety of methods are in use for decontaminating breast pump milk collection kits and related items associated with infant feeding. Choice of a decontamination method is dictated by practical considerations as well as by microbiological effectiveness. Such considerations include speed of the process, safety, convenience and cost. This paper aims to provide best practice guidance for decontamination of this equipment at home and in hospital.

 

Abstract

Introduction: A variety of methods are in use for decontaminating breast pump milk collection kits and related items associated with infant feeding. This paper aims to provide best practice guidance for decontamination of this equipment at home and in hospital. It has been compiled by a joint Working Group of the Healthcare Infection Society and the Infection Prevention Society.

 
Methods: The guidance has been informed by a search of the literature in Medline, the British Nursing Index, the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature, Midwifery & Infant Care and the results of two surveys of UK neonatal units in 2002/3 and 2006, and of members of the Infection Prevention Society in 2014. Since limited good quality evidence was available from these sources much of the guidance represents good practice based on the consensus view of the Working Group.

Key recommendations:

  • Breast pump milk collection kits should not be reused by different mothers unless they have been sterilized in a Sterile Services Department between these different users.

  • When used by the same mother, a detergent wash followed by thorough rinsing and drying after each use gives acceptable decontamination for most circumstances, as long as it is performed correctly.

Additional decontamination precautions to washing, rinsing and drying may be used if indicated by local risk assessments and on advice from the departmental clinicians and Infection Prevention and Control Teams. The microbiological quality of the rinse water is an important consideration, particularly for infants on neonatal units

  • If bottle brushes or breast/nipple shields are used, they should be for use by one mother only. Decontamination should be by the processes used for breast pump milk collection kits.

  • Dummies (soothers, pacifiers or comforters) needed for non-nutritive sucking by infants on neonatal units, should be for single infant use. Manufacturers should provide these dummies ready-to-use and individually packaged. They must be discarded at least every 24 hours or immediately if soiled with anything other than the baby’s saliva. No attempt should be made to decontaminate the dummies, either before or during use.

Conclusion: This guidance provides practical recommendations to support the safe decontamination of breast pump milk collection kits for healthcare professionals to use and communicate to other groups such as parents and carers.

 

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Article detail
E Price, G Weaver, P Hoffman, M Jones, J Gilks, V O’Brien, and G Ridgway

Decontamination of breast pump milk collection kits and related items at home and in hospital: guidance from a Joint Working Group of the Healthcare Infection Society & Infection Prevention Society
Journal of Infection Prevention March 2016 17: 53-62, first published on December 9, 2015 doi:10.1177/1757177415613566

 

 

 

     
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