Lungworm infections in cats: dilemmas and new avenues

Article title: Diagnosis and management of lungworm infections in cats Cornerstones, dilemmas and new avenues

From Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery

Infection of cats by new or ‘neglected’ lungworms is focusing the minds of veterinary parasitologists and creating clinical challenges for veterinary practitioners, according to this research.  The ‘cat lungworm’ has long been regarded as the most significant respiratory parasite of domestic cats in terms of its worldwide distribution and clinical importance – in some cases, producing severe and even fatal disease. Recently, however, other lungworms have assumed increased importance and, with speculation that these parasites may be expanding their geographic range, feline lungworm disease is gaining more attention.

 

Abstract

Practical relevance: Respiratory parasites infecting domestic cats are attracting increased attention in feline clinical practice. In addition to the most commonly recognised ‘cat lungworm’ Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, Troglostrongylus brevior and Capillaria aerophila are now considered important pathogens of the respiratory tract of cats.

Global importance: These parasites are being increasingly diagnosed in several regions of the world and a continuous update on epidemiological changes and advances in diagnosis and control is of practical importance.

Aims: This article reviews current knowledge of lungworms affecting cats, with a special focus on recent insights into diagnosis and management of the diseases they cause. The article also explores some potential new avenues for control of feline parasitic respiratory diseases, and highlights some key areas requiring further research.

 

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Article details

Donato Traversa andAngela Di Cesare
Diagnosis and management of lungworm infections in cats: Cornerstones, dilemmas and new avenues Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery January 2016 18: 7-20, doi:10.1177/1098612X15623113

 

 

     
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