Considering culture, context and complexity in infection prevention intervention research

Article title: Are you serious? From fist bumping to hand hygiene: Considering culture, context and complexity in infection prevention intervention research

From Journal of Infection Prevention

Infection prevention and control (IPC) is an under-resourced research and development topic, with limited evidence for practice in the most basic of IPC measures. A survey of IPS R&D members indicated that what might appear to be simple interactions and interventions in healthcare, such as hand shaking and hand hygiene, should be considered complex interventions taking account of behavior at the individual and social level as well as contextual factors. Future studies need to be designed utilizing comprehensive approaches, e.g. the Medical Research Council complex interventions framework, tailored to the country and more local cultural context, if we are to be serious about evidence for infection prevention and control practice

Abstract

Infection prevention is an under-resourced research and development topic, with limited evidence for practice in the most basic of measures. A survey of IPS R&D members indicated that what might appear to be simple interactions and interventions in healthcare, such as hand shaking and hand hygiene, should be considered complex interventions taking account of behavior at the individual and social level as well as contextual factors. Future studies need to be designed utilizing comprehensive approaches, for example, the Medical Research Council complex interventions framework, tailored to the country and more local cultural context, if we are to be serious about evidence for infection prevention and control practice.

 

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Article details
Opinion/ Comment: J Reilly,  K Currie,  and M Madeo
Are you serious? From fist bumping to hand hygiene: Considering culture, context and complexity in infection prevention intervention research Journal of Infection Prevention 1757177415605659, first published on September 18, 2015 doi:10.1177/1757177415605659

 

 

 

 

     
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