Benefits of a mini-trampoline training program for stroke sufferers

Effects of a predefined mini-trampoline training program on balance, mobility and activities of daily living after stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study

From Clinical Rehabilitation

The ability to control balance in the sitting and standing positions after a stroke is a fundamental skill of motor behaviour that allows autonomy in everyday activities. Like any other motor skill learned by the central nervous system (CNS), postural control strategies can become more efficient and effective with training and practice. This is the first randomized controlled pilot study investigating the effects of a predefined mini-trampoline training program for stroke patients compared to standard balance training in a group. Patients were randomized into two groups: the mini-trampoline group received 10 sessions of balance training using the mini-trampoline over three weeks. The patients of the control group participated 10 times in a group balance training also over three weeks. This study showed that a predefined mini-trampoline training program resulted in significantly increased postural control in stroke patients compared to balance training in a group. Mini-trampoline training also seems to have a positive effect on mobility, gait endurance and the ability to perform activities of daily living.

 

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effects of a predefined mini-trampoline therapy programme for increasing postural control, mobility and the ability to perform activities of daily living after stroke.

Design: Randomized non-blinded controlled pilot study.

Setting: Neurological rehabilitation hospital.

Subjects: First-time stroke; age 18–80 years; independent standing ability for a minimum of 2 minutes.

Intervention: Patients were randomized into two groups: the mini-trampoline group (n= 20) received 10 sessions of balance training using the mini-trampoline over three weeks. The patients of the control group (n =20) participated 10 times in a group balance training also over three weeks.

Main measures: Postural control (Berg Balance Scale, BBS), mobility and gait endurance (timed ‘up and go’ test, TUG; 6-minute walk test, 6MWT) and the ability to perform activities of daily living (Barthel Index, BI). Measurements were undertaken prior to and after the intervention period.

Results: Both groups were comparable before the study. The mini-trampoline group improved significantly more in the BBS (P = 0.003) compared to the control group. Mean or median differences of both groups showed improvements in the TUG 10.12 seconds/7.23 seconds, the 6MWT 135 m/75 m and the BI 20 points/13 points for the mini-trampoline and control group, respectively. These outcome measurements did not differ significantly between the two groups.

Conclusion: A predefined mini-trampoline training programme resulted in significantly increased postural control in stroke patients compared to balance training in a group. Although not statistically significant, the mini-trampoline training group showed increased improvement in mobility and activities of daily living. These differences could have been statistically significant if we had investigated more patients (i.e. a total sample of 84 patients for the TUG, 98 patients for the 6MWT, and 186 patients for the BI).

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Article details

Miklitsch, C. (2013). Effects of a predefined mini-trampoline training programme on balance, mobility and activities of daily living after stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study Clinical Rehabilitation DOI: 10.1177/0269215513485591

     
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