On SAGE Insight: Workplace Bullying and Work Engagement

Article title: Workplace Bullying and Work Engagement: A Self-Determination Model

From Journal of Interpersonal Violence

This study modeled motivational mechanisms that explain the negative effects of workplace bullying on work engagement. Guided by self-determination theory, workplace bullying was predicted to decrease worker engagement indirectly, due to the denial of employees’ basic psychological needs and their intrinsic motivation to work. This study estimated a serial indirect effect to explain the process by which workplace bullying results in work disengagement.

The relationship-damaging behaviors that constitute workplace bullying (e.g., being ignored or ostracized, excessive teasing, being the target of rumors and gossip) make it very difficult to fulfill the relatedness need at work as well. Organizations can expect victimized employees to lack self-determination and become disengaged in their work.

Abstract

This study modeled motivational mechanisms that explain the negative effects of workplace bullying on work engagement. Guided by self-determination theory, workplace bullying was predicted to decrease worker engagement indirectly, due to the denial of employees’ basic psychological needs and their intrinsic motivation to work. From a sample of 243 full-time employees, serial multiple mediation models revealed that the indirect relationships between workplace bullying and work engagement (i.e., vigor, dedication, absorption) were serially mediated by basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation to work. In support of self-determination theory, this study revealed that workplace bullying indirectly disengages employees from their work by denying them of their autonomy and relatedness needs and thwarting their motivation to perform work in a fulfilling way.

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Article details
Workplace Bullying and Work Engagement: A Self-Determination Model
Alan K. Goodboy, Matthew M. Martin, San Bolkan
First Published June 27, 2017
DOI: 10.1177/0886260517717492
From Journal of Interpersonal Violence

 

 

     
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