On SAGE Insight: Impact of social media usage on daytime sleepiness

Article title: Impact of social media usage on daytime sleepiness: A study in a sample of tertiary students in Singapore

From DIGITAL HEALTH

Many tertiary students access social networking sites on a daily basis. With the increased usage of smartphones, accessing social networking sites while commuting, in schools, waiting for friends, television commercial breaks has become prevalent among tertiary students. What started as a lifestyle choice has now become a daily necessity. Such behavior among tertiary students raises an important question for educators: how does social media usage affect tertiary students’ sleep patterns and daytime sleepiness, their attention difficulties, especially in school? Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the relationships between tertiary students’ self-reports of social media usage and daytime sleepiness.

Social media usage was investigated as one of the possible causes of increased daytime sleepiness among students from a tertiary institution in Singapore. The results showed that accessing SNS late at night led to increased daytime sleepiness. The results of this study raise a health concern regarding social media usage and daytime sleepiness among the tertiary students surveyed.

Abstract

Objective:
Many tertiary students access social networking sites on a daily basis. With the increased usage of smartphones, accessing social networking sites while commuting, in schools, waiting for friends, television commercial breaks has become prevalent among tertiary students. What started as a lifestyle choice has now become a daily necessity. Such behavior among tertiary students raises an important question for educators: how does social media usage affect tertiary students’ sleep patterns and daytime sleepiness, their attention difficulties, especially in school? Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the relationships between tertiary students’ self-reports of social media usage and daytime sleepiness.

Design:
The design was a cross-sectional, quantitative research study.
Methods: We used a survey that contained questions concerning demographic data, daytime sleepiness, total sleep time and social media usage and a version of the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, modified for use in tertiary students, were used for data collection (n ¼ 969).

Results:
The most preferred tool for accessing social networking sites was smartphones and WhatsApp was the most accessed site. Results indicated that nocturnal technology use has a weak, negative impact on tertiary students’ quantity of sleep that may lead to daytime sleepiness. Local Singapore students spent significantly more time on social networking sites at night compared to foreign students. As a result, local students experienced more daytime sleepiness compared to foreign students.

Conclusions:
Prolonged social media usage, especially in bed, has a negative impact on tertiary students’ daytime sleepiness. Since the technology is such an integral part of most tertiary students’ lives, it is important to understand the impact it has on their sleep and daytime sleepiness.

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Article details
Impact of social media usage on daytime sleepiness: A study in a sample of tertiary students in Singapore
A M A Nasirudeen, Lau Lee Chin Adeline, Koh Wat Neo Josephine, Lim Lay Seng, Li Wenjie
First Published April 16, 2017
DOI: 10.1177/2055207617699766
DIGITAL HEALTH

 

     
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