On SAGE Insight: Does instructional video footage improve tackle technique for rugby players?

Article title: Does instructional video footage improve tackle technique?

From International Journal of Sports Science & Coaching

Participation in men’s and women’s rugby is increasing in the United States with a 350% rise in participation since 2004. As a collision sport, there is an inherent injury risk with participation and prevention of potential injury requires understanding of the mechanisms by which injuries typically occur. Authors of this study hypothesized that watching an educational video on rugby tackling technique would alter lower extremity kinematics and reduce cervical spine and head acceleration during tackling. Participants were shown video instruction on tackling technique then performed another series of tackles. Data were compared pre- and post-educational intervention. A fixed effects model was used to compare the effect of repetition versus educational intervention.

Findings suggest more experienced players respond to instructional intervention, but repetition rather than observation may be more important for younger high school aged rugby players to learn to tackle effectively. More experienced collegiate rugby players altered the angle of knee flexion during tackling after watching the educational video, which was significant for female players. This suggests more experienced players were able to integrate the instruction in the educational video better than the novice players and learn to tackle in a way that is safer. 

Abstract

There is a high incidence of injury during rugby tackling. Tackle biomechanics are linked to this injury risk. The effectiveness of educational methods in teaching safe rugby tackling for players of various ages and experience levels has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that watching an educational video on rugby tackling technique would alter lower extremity kinematics and reduce cervical spine and head acceleration during tackling. Kinematics and kinetics of 50 collegiate and high school-aged rugby players were recorded while tackling an opponent in a laboratory setting. Movement of the lower extremity, upper body, and head were quantified with a motion analysis system. Participants were shown video instruction on tackling technique then performed another series of tackles. Data were compared pre- and post-educational intervention. A fixed effects model was used to compare the effect of repetition versus educational intervention. Skilled collegiate players tackled with significantly greater mean knee flexion angle post-educational intervention relative to pre-instruction, indicative of better technique. The fixed effects model indicated that video instruction decreased acceleration by a mean 51.8 m/s2 in collegiate players. However, the effect of repetition was shown to increase peak acceleration by a mean 11.2 m/s2. In contrast, the educational intervention resulted in an increased acceleration of 15.4 m/s2 for high school players, but the effect of repetition was shown to decrease acceleration by a mean of 5.2 m/s2. Experienced players respond as expected to video instructional intervention. Repetition may be more important for younger rugby players to learn effective tackling.

Read this article for free

Article details
Does instructional video footage improve tackle technique?
Hamish A Kerr, Eric H Ledet, Ashar Ata, Jennifer L Newitt, Matthew Santa Barbara, Milan Kahanda and Erin Sperry Schlueter
DOI: 10.1177/1747954117711867
First Published June 2, 2017 
From International Journal of Sports Science & Coaching

 

 

 

     
This entry was posted in Education, Health, SAGE Insight and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply