On SAGE Insight: Faking to finish: Women’s accounts of feigning sexual pleasure to end unwanted sex

From Sexualities

This study explores the ways in which women account for ‘problem’ sex and the links they made between these accounts and faking orgasm. A group of female undergraduate students in Canada were interviewed around the themes of talking about sex, faking orgasm and resisting feigning sexual pleasure. The author’s used discourse analysis to explore how women negotiate and account for experiences of ‘problem’ sex in the context of exaggerating sexual pleasure and faking orgasm. Negative evaluations (it was bed sex), as well as a range of hedging devices including negations (it was not good), disclaimers (it wasn’t non-consensual but…) and modifiers (kind of forcing me) were analysed to highlight women’s negative sexual experiences so these are not unheard.

Abstract

In this article, we explore women’s accounts of consensual but unwanted sex, and how these accounts connect to feigning sexual pleasure. Interviews were conducted with 15 women and we employed a discursive analytic approach to examine the data. All women used discursive features (e.g. negation, hedging) to situate at least one of their past sexual experiences as problematic although all avoided the use of explicit labels such as rape or coercion. Furthermore, women commonly faked orgasm as a means to end these troubling sexual encounters. We argue the importance of considering women’s accounts of ‘problem’ sex so these experiences are not dismissed.

Read this article for free

Article details
Emily J Thomas, Monika Stelzl and Michelle N Lafrance
Faking to finish: Women’s accounts of feigning sexual pleasure to end unwanted sex
Sexualities 1363460716649338, first published on July 20, 2016
doi: 10.1177/1363460716649338

 

 

 

     
This entry was posted in Gender & Sexuality, SAGE Insight and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply