London’s Olympic legacy: The challenges of long term sustainability

London’s Olympic legacy and the Imagine methodology

From Local Economy

The London Olympics is a major urban regeneration project with a budget of 9.345 bn. The site itself will have a major impact on the city as a whole. Previous studies have shown that legacy can be a significant issue. Studies have suggested the London Olympic project is one of the biggest urban regeneration projects in Europe. This development is already having an impact on the lives of residents and this is not always positive. Another in our series of articles highlighting various aspects of Olympic Games to celebrate the countdown to 2012, this article describes the process adopted in the analysis of the Olympic Village’s transformation from World Media Site to a sustainable part of the Greater London metropolis, considering the challenges of longer term sustainability.

Abstract

In 2010 Future of London commissioned academics to work with representatives from the London Boroughs, to consider the legacy of the Olympic Village taking shape in Stratford, in the East End of London. The exercise, in the form of a workshop, was to: review the current context/situation; prioritize issues; envisage future options; explore and develop relevant sustainability indicators; develop a forward plan for community development. This article describes the process adopted in the analysis of the Olympic Village’s transformation from World Media Site to a sustainable part of the Greater London metropolis. The methodology applied, Imagine, is described and some of the key outputs from the analysis and design of legacy process are described. In conclusion the article examines the oeuvre of projects of this kind when set against the challenges of longer term sustainability.

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Article details

Bell, S., & Farren Bradley, J. (2012). London’s Olympic legacy and the Imagine methodology Local Economy, 27 (1), 55-67 DOI: 10.1177/0269094211425325

     
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