Can football (soccer) tournaments trigger domestic abuse?

Can the FIFA World Cup football (soccer) tournament be associated with an increase in domestic abuse?

From Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency

Soccer continues to evolve as a global business; the English Premier League, for example, involves 337 foreign players from 66 countries with games being televised to over 200 countries. This study aims to establish whether empirical evidence exists to support the anecdotal view that the Fe´de´ration Internationale de Football Association world cup football (soccer) tournament can be associated with a rise in reported domestic abuse incidents.

The research used quantitative analysis and examined monthly and daily domestic abuse incidents reported to a police force in the North West of England across three separate tournaments (2002, 2006, and 2010). The analysis found the risk of domestic abuse rose by 26 percent when the English national team won or drew, and a 38 percent increase when the national team lost. Although this is a relatively small study, it has significant ramifications due to the global nature of televised football (soccer) tournaments. If replicated, it presents significant opportunities to identify and reduce incidents of domestic abuse associated with televised soccer games.

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to establish whether empirical evidence exists to support the anecdotal view that the Fe´de´ration Internationale de Football Association world cup football (soccer) tournament can be associated with a rise in reported domestic abuse incidents, when viewed remotely via television.

Method: A quantitative analysis, using Poisson and negative binomial regression models looked at monthly and daily domestic abuse incidents reported to a police force in the North West of England across three separate tournaments (2002, 2006, and 2010). Results: The study found two statistically significant trends. First, a match day trend showed the risk of domestic abuse rose by 26 percent when the English nationalteam won or drew, and a 38 percent increase when the national team lost. Second, a tournament trend was apparent, as reported domestic abuse incidents increased in frequency with each new tournament.
Conclusion: Although this is a relatively small study, it has significant ramifications due to the global nature of televised football (soccer) tournaments. If replicated, it presents significant opportunities to identify and reduce incidents of domestic abuse associated with televised soccer games.

 

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Article details

Authors: Stuart Kirby, Brian Francis, and Rosalie O’Flaherty

Can the FIFA World Cup Football (Soccer) Tournament Be Associated with an Increase in Domestic Abuse?Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 0022427813494843, first published on July 22, 2013 doi:10.1177/0022427813494843

 

     
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