Reviewing patterns of drug epidemics to consider cost effective intervention programs

Drug generations in the 2000s: An analysis of arrestee data

From Journal of Drug Issues 

Much empirical evidence indicates that the popularity of various drugs tends to increase and wane over time producing episodic epidemics of particular drugs. Drug epidemics lead to the rise of drug generations. For the past two decades, drug epidemics have been studied extensively. This article examines the drug generations present in the 2000s among arrestees in the 10 locations served by the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring–II program (ADAM). This article first reviews the drug epidemics framework and then presents how the drug generations framework follows from it. At all 10 locations, the findings show that crack use is still common among older arrestees but not among arrestees born more recently. Marijuana is the drug most common among younger arrestees. Patterns of drug use can have important implications for the development of timely, targeted drug abuse interventions. Drug scholars, analysts and policy makers need to be aware of trends in drug use to develop appropriate and cost effective programs.

Abstract

Much empirical evidence indicates that the popularity of various drugs tends to increase and wane over time producing episodic epidemics of particular drugs. These epidemics mostly affect persons reaching their late teens at the time of the epidemic resulting in distinct drug generations. This article examines the drug generations present in the 2000s among arrestees in the 10 locations served by the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring–II program. At all 10 locations, our findings show that crack use is still common among older arrestees but not among arrestees born more recently. Marijuana is the drug most common among younger arrestees. The article also examines trends in heroin, methamphetamine, and powder cocaine use among arrestees at the few locations where their use was substantial.

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Article details
Golub, A., & Brownstein, H. (2013). Drug Generations in the 2000s: An Analysis of Arrestee Data Journal of Drug Issues DOI: 10.1177/0022042613475599

     
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