On SAGE Insight: The obstacles in the path of the success of women journalists in Chinese media


Article title: Naked Swimmers: Chinese women journalists’ experience of media commercialization

From Media Culture Society

In accordance with the global trend of women’s employment in journalism, China has witnessed an unprecedented increase in women’s participation in the news profession over the last two decades. More women than ever before undertook journalism education in universities. The change is so phenomenal that scholars have even talked about a ‘gender switch’ in the news profession.

This article tries to provide an insight into the obstacles in the path of the success of women journalists in Chinese media. The author identified and analyzed three sources of gender inequality in Chinese journalism. These are the women-unfriendly commercial contract and salary systems, weak women’s association and trade unions, and a dominant newsroom culture of sexism. The paper concludes To pursue gender equality, Chinese women journalists need independence not only from the patriarchal state but also from the male-dominated market.

Abstract

In accordance with the global trend of women’s employment in journalism, China has witnessed an unprecedented increase in women’s participation in the news profession over the last two decades. However, while accounting for more than 40% of the labor force in journalism, women still tend to occupy roles with lower pay and less power. Against this background, this article tries to provide an insight into the obstacles in the path of the success of women journalists in Chinese media. Through in-depth interviews with the journalists, three major constraining mechanisms are identified: women-unfriendly job contracts and salary systems, weak women’s associations and trade unions, and the prevalence of a sexist newsroom culture.

Read this article for free

Article details

Haiyan Wang
‘Naked Swimmers’: Chinese women journalists’ experience of media commercialization
Media, Culture & Society May 2016 38: 489-505, first published on April 12, 2016 doi:10.1177/0163443716643148

 

 

 

     
This entry was posted in Communication & Media, Gender & Sexuality, SAGE Insight and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply