On SAGE Insight: Women, work and industrial relations in Australia in 2017

From Journal Industrial Relations

Throughout 2017, public interest, parliamentary debate and academic research about women, work and industrial relations centred around a few key themes: pay and income inequality, health and well-being at work and the intersection of paid and unpaid work

The data search and analysis in this paper consisted of three parts, resulting in separate datasets, which afford insights into related yet distinct areas: The media articles highlight themes and trends, the parliamentary documents demonstrate how the theme of women and industrial relations is discussed within a public policy context and the academic publications provide an overview of developments in scholarly literature. Global news and several academic databases and speeches of the leaders of the two major parties, reports and bills were used for this research.

A thematic overlap was evident across the three datasets, despite the time lag associated with academic research and publication. This is a significant finding, emphasising that the inequalities experienced by women in the labour market are long term and entrenched. Policy changes to address them are often incremental with impacts that may not be easily or quickly discernible.

Abstract

Throughout 2017, public interest, parliamentary debate and academic research about women, work and industrial relations centred around a few key themes: pay and income inequality, health and well-being at work and the intersection of paid and unpaid work. These themes were identified in three related yet distinct mediums: the media, parliamentary debate and academic literature. Automated content analysis software was used to assist in the thematic analysis of media articles and the House of Representatives Hansard, supplemented by a manual analysis of relevant academic publications. A thematic overlap was evident across the three datasets, despite the time lag associated with academic research and publication. This is a significant finding, emphasising that the inequalities experienced by women in the labour market are long term and entrenched.

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Article details
Women, work and industrial relations in Australia in 2017
Sarah KaineMartijn Boersma,
First Published April 20, 2018
DOI: 10.1177/0022185618764204
From Journal Industrial Relations

 

 

 

     
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