On SAGE Insight: The after-effects of youth  unemployment

Article title: The after-effects of youth  unemployment: More vulnerable persons are less  likely to succeed in Youth  Guarantee programs

From Economic and Industrial Democracy

Unemployment creates significant psychological and physiological distress for the individual concerned. It has a variety of severe effects not only on individuals, but also on societies and the economy. Youth unemployment is of serious concern to European societies today, as young people have been particularly badly affected by the economic recession. This article investigates unemployed adolescents’ success in re-employment programs. It proposes that not being in employment, education, or training indicates a setback in the achievement of important life goals. This study aimed to predict adolescents’ chances of succeeding on an apprenticeship program after having gone through a period of being not in employment, education or training (NEET).

This study shows that being out of employment, education and training is very likely to ‘leave scars’. It seems that people who are likely to have suffered more while they were NEET, might need an extra boost to their well-being and regulatory abilities, in order to be able to succeed on re-employment programmes. Fostering young people’s resources of social support, for example by improving their private relationship with their parents, might be one way to achieve that. Counselling them for depressive affect might be another. Also, policy makers and public funding institutions might benefit from the findings of this study, when deciding which particular Youth Guarantee scheme to implement and support. Authors cautiously conclude that programs that pay attention to young people’s previous NEET experience and their private situation at home might be more effective than others.

Abstract

This article investigates unemployed adolescents’ success in re-employment  programs. It proposes that not being in employment, education, or training indicates a setback in the achievement of important life goals, which affects mental health and success in re-employment programs. Adolescents who are more affected by the experience of unemployment will be even less likely to succeed. An analysis of longitudinal archival records of 300 adolescents in a Youth Guarantee apprenticeship scheme confirms the expectations. Adolescents who were more vulnerable during unemployment and who had a worse relationship with their parents when starting the apprenticeship were more likely to drop out within the first year. The effect of age was moderated by relationship quality. The results show that taking the prior experience of not being in employment, education and training into account can offer a new understanding for the success of re-employment programs. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

Read the article for free

Article details
The after-effects of youth unemployment: More vulnerable persons are less likely to succeed in Youth Guarantee programs
Eva Selenko
Economic and Industrial Democracy
DOI: 10.1177/0143831X16653186

 

 

 

     
This entry was posted in Business & Management, SAGE Insight and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply