Towards the gentrification of Black Power

From Race & Class

Black Power Studies has emerged as one of the most exciting and dynamic subfields in Africana Studies, African-American History and American History. The explosion over the last decade in US scholarship on the Black Power Movement provides the context for this close reading and textual analysis of Peniel Joseph’s latest book, Dark Days, Bright Nights: from Black Power to Barack Obama.

Abstract

The recent explosion in US scholarship on the Black Power Movement provides the context for this close reading and textual analysis of Peniel Joseph’s latest book, Dark Days, Bright Nights: from Black Power to Barack Obama. Taking into account the context of the book’s appearance and the critical public debate surrounding it, this article unpacks Joseph’s discussion of Black Power, paying particular attention to his rendering of ‘self-determination’ and other key political ideologies. It asks what is at stake for Black radical memory when knowledge production on the Black Power Movement is governed by the dictates of the American marketplace and, more specifically, the publishing industry. In addition, it briefly reconnoitres the ways that Black radical (collective) memory can serve as a counterbalance to the erasures of marketplace history, and keep us attentive to the contemporary pertinence and unfinished business of the past. The article closes by highlighting some alternative routes taken by scholars concerned with the future of Black Power Studies.

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Article details
Jonathan Fenderson
Towards the gentrification of Black Power(?)|
Race & Class July–September 2013 55: 1-22, doi:10.1177/0306396813486593

 

 

 

 

     
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