On SAGE Insight: How serious is binge drinking among college students with disabilities?

Article title: Rates and Correlates of Binge Drinking Among College Students With Disabilities, United States, 2013

From Public Health Reports

 This study finds that college students with disabilities binge drink more often than their non-disabled student peers. The study provides the first picture of alcohol use and binge drinking by US college students with disabilities.

“Substance abuse is the topic of high public interest, yet little attention is given to the experiences of college students with disabilities,” wrote the study authors Steven L. West et al. “Given that binge drinking is highly correlated with academic failure, drop-out, and an increased risk for various negative health conditions, such use by students with disabilities may place them at extreme risk for various negative outcomes.”

“Alcohol and drug prevention efforts are common on college campuses, and many are specific to the groups they target, such as members of fraternities or sororities or student athletes,” continued the study authors. “However, students with disabilities are largely overlooked in such programming. Our finding that students with disabilities drink and binge drink at considerable rates calls for more preventive efforts targeting this underserved population.”

Abstract

Objective: Our objective was to provide the first comprehensive picture of alcohol use and binge drinking by US college students with disabilities (SWDs), who represent at least 11% (1.6 million) of the US college student population.

Methods: In fall 2013, we used a stratified random sampling technique to identify and recruit 2440 SWDs from 122 US colleges and universities. A total of 1285 (53%) SWDs from 61 (50%) colleges and universities completed a survey of alcohol and other drug use and the use of substances by student peers. We conducted 4 multiple logistic regression analyses to compare binge-drinking and non–binge-drinking SWDs by potential correlates of such use and a final model that included only significant variables.

Results: SWDs aged <21 vs [1]21 (odds ratio [OR] ¼ 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.99) who spent more time vs less time socializing (OR ¼ 1.24; 95% CI, 1.11-1.38), who spent less time vs more time studying (OR ¼ –0.89; 95% CI, –0.80 to –0.99), and who used vs did not use marijuana (OR ¼ 1.44; 95% CI, 1.18-1.75) or amphetamines (OR ¼ 1.82; 95% CI, 1.15-2.89) were significantly more likely to binge drink. SWDs who reported using barbiturates were less likely to binge drink than were those who did not use barbiturates (OR ¼ –0.36; 95% CI, –0.21 to –0.61). In the final model, use of amphetamines (OR ¼ 1.74; 95% CI, 1.15-2.65) or marijuana (OR ¼ 1.60; 95% CI, 1.32-1.94) was the highest predictor of binge drinking.

Conclusion: SWDs’ reported rates of binge drinking, although high, were not as high as those of nondisabled college students. Nevertheless, prevention efforts should be targeted toward college SWDs.

Read the article for free

 Article details
Article title: Rates and Correlates of Binge Drinking Among College Students With Disabilities, United States, 2013
Steven L. West, PhD, Carolyn W. Graham, PhD, Peter Temple, MS
First Published June 22, 2017
From Public Health Reports
DOI: 10.1177/0033354917713470

 

 

 

 

     
This entry was posted in Health, SAGE Insight and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply