Improving health outcomes for young people with long term conditions

Article title: Improving health outcomes for young people with long term conditions: The role of digital communication in current and future patient–clinician communication for NHS providers of specialist clinical services for young people – LYNC study protocol

From DIGITAL HEALTH

Young people living with long term conditions are vulnerable to health service disengagement and this endangers their long term adult health. This can be particularly problematic at the time of transition from paediatric to adult services.  Research suggests that service level factors that affect engagement with health care of young people with long term conditions include: poor patient–clinician communication; inflexible access to people and information; lack of person-centred health care and the need for continuity and relationship development. This multi-method evaluation aims to understand the benefits, costs and consequences of the use of digital clinical communication in the UK NHS for people requiring specialist services for long term conditions. The study focuses on young people as, for this cohort, ability to use digital communication will not be a limiting factor.

 

Abstract

Background Young people living with long term conditions are vulnerable to health service disengagement. This endangers their long term health. Studies report requests for digital forms of communication – email, text, social media – with their health care team. Digital clinical communication is troublesome for the UK NHS.

Aim In this article we aim to present the research protocol for evaluating the impacts and outcomes of digital clinical communications for young people living with long term conditions and provide critical analysis of their use, monitoring and evaluation by NHS providers (LYNC study: Long term conditions, Young people, Networked Communications).

Methods The research involves: (a) patient and public involvement activities with 16–24 year olds with and without long term health conditions; (b) six literature reviews; (c) case studies – the main empirical part of the study – and (d) synthesis and a consensus meeting. Case studies use a mixed methods design. Interviews and non-participant observation of practitioners and patients communicating in up to 20 specialist clinical settings will be combined with data, aggregated at the case level (non-identifiable patient data) on a range of clinical outcomes meaningful within the case and across cases. We will describe the use of digital clinical communication from the perspective of patients, clinical staff, support staff and managers, interviewing up to 15 young people and 15 staff per case study. Outcome data includes emergency admissions, A&E attendance and DNA (did not attend) rates. Case studies will be analysed to understand impacts of digital clinical communication on patient health outcomes, health care costs and consumption, ethics and patient safety.

 

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Article details

Improving health outcomes for young people with long term conditions: The role of digital communication in current and future patient–clinician communication for NHS providers of specialist clinical services for young people – LYNC study protocol

Frances E Griffiths, Helen Atherton, Jack R Barker, Jonathan AK Cave, Kathryn Dennick, Peter Dowdall, Joe Fraser, Caroline Huxley, Sung-Wook Kim, Jason J Madan, Harjit Matharu, Luhanga Musumadi, Tom M Palmer, Moli Paul, Sailesh Sankaranarayanan, Anne-Marie Slowther, Mark A Sujan, Paul A Sutcliffe, Jackie Sturt

Digital Health Jun 2015, 1 DOI: 10.1177/2055207615593698

 

 

     
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