The interplay between Elementary school students’ academic skills and individual support from the teacher

Elementary school teachers adapt their instructional support according to students’ academic skills

A variable and person-oriented approach

From
International Journal of Behavioral Development

This study increases our understanding of the role that an individual student’s academic performance plays in the ways in which teachers deal with that student  This longitudinal study provided new insights of the interplay between students’ academic skills and the individual support and attention they receive from the teacher in first and second grades of primary school. The research examined only the amount of instruction and attention teacher gave to particular child in classroom during normal classroom instruction.

Abstract

This study examined the longitudinal associations between children’s academic skills and the instructional support teachers gave individual students. A total of 253 Finnish children were tested on reading and math skills twice in the first grade and once in the second grade. The teachers of these children rated the instructional support that they gave each child in reading and mathematics. The results showed that the poorer the student’s reading and math skills were, the more support and attention the student received from his or her teacher later on. However, instructional support did not contribute positively to the subsequent development of the students’ academic skills. The person-oriented analyses showed that a relatively small group of children, that is, those showing the poorest academic skills, received the largest dose of teacher support, both with respect to reading and mathematics.

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Article details
Noona Kiuru,  Jari-Erik Nurmi, Esko Leskinen, Minna Torppa,  Anna-Maija Poikkeus,  Marja-Kristiina Lerkkanen,  and Pekka Niem
Elementary school teachers adapt their instructional support according to students’ academic skills: A variable and person-oriented approach International Journal of Behavioral Development 0165025415575764, first published on July 7, 2015 doi:10.1177/0165025415575764

 

 

 

 

     
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